Is Avoiding Men the Key to a Good Life?

Ever wondered what people do to live over a hundred years? Take it from Jessie Gallan, a 109-year old woman from Kintore, Scotland – the key to longevity is staying away from men! Sorry men, but when a 109-year old woman says it, it’s probably true.

In 2015, Holiday Retirement conducted a survey across America to see what makes people live over 100 years. The survey took a deep and detailed look into the lives of the respondents. For some, it was family, for others it was living every day like it’s your last. However, Jessie Gallan’s response was pretty unique – staying away from men.

The old gal says that that’s the key for living nearly 110 years. Born in 1906, she lived in a rural setting her whole life and says that men should be avoided simply because they’re more trouble than they’re worth.

After finishing school, Jessie found her first job at a farm kitchen, but quit it soon. She later worked as a housemaid and then the service industry. She had a simple life free of stress and never found a man she’d spend her life with. Jessie Gallan spent her final years in Crosby House, a retirement home where she met a new friend – Sarah Jane. The two women immediately hit it off and spent every day together, listening to music and enjoying each other’s company.

Sarah says that Jessie was a very independent person before her passing in March 2015. She also revealed the secret to Sarah herself – that the key to her longevity was staying away from men. Additionally, she also said that porridge, which she’s been eating nearly every day of her life, is another factor for her incredible longevity.

And, while there are no studies to back Jessie’s claim, many women agree that looking for a good man is pointless. Most men turn out to be more trouble than they’re worth, as Jessie said, so maybe it’s time to stop looking for Prince Charming and let him find you. That is if you want to live as long as Jessie.

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