Science

How proteins meet on the cell membrane — ScienceDaily

Scripps Research scientists have uncovered the workings of a critical process in cell survival. Their study, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to show exactly how a protein called talin activates another critical protein, called integrin, to do its job on the cell membrane. While the researchers …

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Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments — ScienceDaily

For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It’s hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are …

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Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons — ScienceDaily

With today’s technology, we can 3-D-print sculptures, mechanical parts, prosthetics, even guns and food. But a team of University of Utah biomedical engineers have developed a method to 3-D-print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons, a process that will greatly improve a patient’s recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, …

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Vagus nerve stimulation reduced inflammation and restored cognitive function after injury — ScienceDaily

For adults over age 65, surgical complications can dampen not only their physical health but also their mental sharpness, with more than half of high-risk cases declining into delirium. In research published this week in the journal Brain Stimulation, Duke University scientists show in a mouse model that a current treatment for seizures can also …

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Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons — ScienceDaily

Attempting to make dopamine-producing neurons out of glial cells in mouse brains, a group of researchers instead converted mature inhibitory neurons into dopaminergic cells. Their findings, appearing October 11 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, reveal that — contrary to previous belief — it is possible to reprogram one mature neuron type into another without …

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Researchers update global record of medically significant scorpions — ScienceDaily

Scorpions can be found at every corner of the globe and on six of the seven continents, from the southern tip of South America to the arid expanse of the Sahara Desert. That makes any rigorous accounting of the world’s venomous scorpions — and their various effects on human beings — an extremely tall task. …

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Fingerprint drug screen test works on the living and deceased — ScienceDaily

A revolutionary drug test developed from research carried out at the University of East Anglia can detect four classes of drugs in traces of sweat found in a fingerprint. And the technology works on both the living and deceased. New research published in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology shows how the Intelligent Fingerprinting Drug Screening …

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Potential assay artefacts in anti-malarial screening documented — ScienceDaily

Malaria remains an economic and health burden to the developing world. As plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, is acquiring rapid resistance against currently used drugs, identification of new classes of anti-malarials remains an urgent need. Potential anti-malarials include small molecules, peptides, antibodies or plant extracts with likely medicinal properties. These agents are often prepared …

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Never forget a face? Research suggests people know an average of 5,000 faces — ScienceDaily

For the first time scientists have been able to put a figure on how many faces people actually know- a staggering 5,000 on average. The research team, from the University of York, tested study participants on how many faces they could recall from their personal lives and the media, as well as the number of …

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Humans may have colonized Madagascar later than previously thought — ScienceDaily

New archaeological evidence from southwest Madagascar reveals that modern humans colonized the island thousands of years later than previously thought, according to a study published October 10, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Atholl Anderson from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and colleagues. Madagascar’s colonization is key for tracing prehistoric human dispersal …

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Redrawing the structure of an immune system protein — ScienceDaily

Researchers have revealed the structure of an essential immune protein, creating future possibilities to develop more effective medicines for a range of illnesses from cancer to neurological diseases. University of Tokyo researchers made this discovery with computerized image analysis and modern electron microscope imaging. Researchers verified the structure of natural immunoglobulin M (IgM) protein, an …

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Sexes differ when it comes to comfort during and after exercise, study finds — ScienceDaily

New research from the University at Buffalo has, for the first time, identified differences between men and women in their preferences for maintaining comfort both while exercising and in recovery. The results could one day inform the development of new athletic apparel. The human body has a variety of automatic mechanisms in place to respond …

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Seizures begin with a muffle — ScienceDaily

Some patients describe epileptic seizures like an earthquake from within, starting slow and growing without their control. To a brain researcher, seizures are an electrical firestorm of neuronal activation in the brain. Now, studies at Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University), have shown that some types of seizure paradoxically begin with a hush: a …

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New study shows that cancer cells hijack normal body chemistry — ScienceDaily

New research from the University of Illinois at Chicago shows that cancer cells in the fallopian tube affect normal chemical signaling between reproductive tissues and stimulate the release of norepinephrine, a small molecule hormone, from the ovary. Reported in ACS Central Science, an open-access journal published by the American Chemical Society, the study suggests that …

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Researchers use new technique to draw conclusions from disparate diet studies — ScienceDaily

If you want to lower your low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, called LDL or, colloquially, “bad cholesterol,” the research is clear about one thing: You should exchange saturated fats with unsaturated fat. If you want to know what you should use to sauté your dinner, that’s a harder question to answer. Many of the studies establishing that …

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